By Shannon Carlin

For those who were upset by Bruce Springsteen‘s decision to perform “Fortunate Son” at the Concert For Valor in Washington D.C. on Veterans Day, John Fogerty—the songwriter behind the 1969 track—says to cool it.

Fogerty took to his Facebook to defend Springsteen’s performance of the song at the concert honoring veterans writing that the song was written during a different time, “during the Vietnam War over forty-five years ago” when an “ultra conservative administration” tried to paint anyone who didn’t agree with them as “un-American.” It’s this same administration, Fogerty writes, that “shamefully ignored and mistreated the soldiers returning from Vietnam. ”

Related: Foo Fighters, Bruce Springsteen, Zac Brown Perform ‘Fortunate Son’ at Concert for Valor: Watch

“As an American and a songwriter I am proud that the song still has resonance,” he wrote. “I do believe that its meaning gets misinterpreted and even usurped by various factions wishing to make their own case. At its core I believe the issue is really about what a great country we have that a song like this can be performed in a setting like Concert For Valor.”

Fogerty goes on to express his gratitude for anyone who has put their life on the line for the United States, writing, “As a man who was drafted and served his country during those times, I have ultimate respect for the men and women who protect us today and demand that they receive the respect that they deserve.”

This statement comes after reports that Springsteen’s performance, alongside the Foo Fighters and the Zac Brown Band, of “Fortunate Son” was not well-received by those in attendance of the concert and those on social media who felt it was disrespectful to perform what many consider to be an anti-war song.

Read Fogerty’s full statement, which featured a photo of him and Springsteen performing together, below:

“Fortunate Son” is a song I wrote during the Vietnam War over forty-five years ago. As an American and a songwriter I am proud that the song still has resonance. I do believe that its meaning gets misinterpreted and even usurped by various factions wishing to make their own case. At its core I believe the issue is really about what a great country we have that a song like this can be performed in a setting like Concert For Valor.

Years ago, an ultra conservative administration tried to paint anyone who questioned its policies as “un-American”. That same administration shamefully ignored and mistreated the soldiers returning from Vietnam.

As a man who was drafted and served his country during those times, I have ultimate respect for the men and women who protect us today and demand that they receive the respect that they deserve.

 

 

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